2014

“The aesthetics impress as usual. Richard’s paintings are always gorgeous to look at and they continue his quest for truth and beauty in a visual language he has painstakingly developed. A language that is earthy and transcendent. Richard invents his painterly environments often alluding to the nuances between water and life, which is a very Taoist idea.” – Phil Brown, 2014

“The winner of the painting prize was Richard Dunlop, an artist of considerable standing who creates what he self-consciously terms a “neo-romantic Australian landscape”. The artist enjoys combining traditions in art, blending the empirical studies of the natural science illustrations of the nineteenth century with inventive Romantic explorations of the natural world to create something of a personal pictorial mythology.” – Professor Sasha Grishin, Sydney Morning Herald 2014

“One of my favourite sources for emergent trends.” – Fanny Tsai

“Water shapes its current from the lie of the land.” – Sun Tzu c. 551-496 BC; Joshua Wong

“Being the nephew of revered Oz High Court judge, Lionel Keith Murphy, who sought to single-handedly re-shape modern Australia in his own image but also for the benefit of others since the mid-1970’s, it does not altogether surprise me that Richard inherited a rarified, somewhat profound, somewhat confounding sense of justice, and seems – like the odd barrister that I’ve encountered – to play cat and mouse with a painting, sometimes offering it enough rope to hang itself, and when he’s in the right mood, making it difficult for us to discern whether a reflection of our nature has been with us the whole time or whether it completely newborn to the world.” – Michael Kirby 2014

“Paint the living universe, this sun, this cloud, this rain, this tree, this animal, this day, this hour, this wind, this kind of earth, this kind of water, this sound in the grass, this pitch of wind, this anger, this confusion, this silence, put it all in there eventually”. – Advice received from Ugo Rondinone

“With Goya Nights (Witches in the Air) and related works, featuring Ku Klux Klan figures which transcend national and ethical boundaries, the artist’s expectation of the rise of the new right international politics precedes other artists, and just like Goya’s mature political subtleties, is likely to be regarded as a seminal series.” – B. Schwabsky